Ashland Publicity

I've received some incredible feedback from listeners worldwide for my latest recording project, Ashland.

Thanks to Matt Mikkelsen and Palmer Morse at  Spruce Tone Films all the way over in California for sharing the work on their Being Hear Facebook page. I've also had a recent mention from the Bumblebee Conservation Trust on Twitter, regarding a suburban bumblebee recording that was played just over a week ago on BBC Radio 4.

I'm putting the finishing touches on several custom recording rigs for my next project and getting set for some superb dawn choruses in the Cotswolds and farther afield.

More soon.

Plastic Competition Entry

Pleased to announce that my short environmental film Plastic has been selected for entry in this year's NaturVision Short Film Award, The (In)Finite Nature of Plastic.

The award honours the film that best critically examines the use of this problematic material, its prevalence in the ground and water, and its threat to living creatures.

Ashland Launches

My latest recording project, Ashland, is now online.

Its a long-term, sonic exploration of Northern Ireland’s Drumnaph Nature Reserve and its surrounding landscapes.

Please listen, share and enjoy (with headphones and quiet surroundings).

Ashland

Work has started on my latest recording project, Ashland. Featuring a fresh sonic and narrative perspective on one of our best-known native UK trees, it should be available in early spring 2018.

I've had to postpone work on a related short-term project around Dartmoor due to anthropogenic disturbance in the recording area; if the situation improves, I plan to revisit in the future.

I'm also developing a number of specialised recording methods for bumblebees and making plans for nocturnal red fox recordings.

Owls, Bats & Editing

It's been a superb autumn for recording, but it hasn't all been plain sailing.

During a hike through woodland, I nearly lost thousands of pounds' worth of audio gear after slipping on a rotten branch and falling forwards (I was lucky I didn't break my arm).

When fog thickened without warning on another trip, I got lost, had to find my way through thick scrub and slippery rocks in the pitch-dark, then had to jump over an electric fence without knowing exactly where I would land!

Despite these challenges, I've been rewarded with some incredible experiences. 

Highlights include: common and soprano pipistrelle bats feeding close to a small deciduous copse in a Cotswold meadow; a pair of tawny owls swooping through beech trees at dusk, framed by water droplets falling onto a carpet of decaying leaves; and strong, northerly winds filtering through a mature, crispy, late-autumn woodland canopy.

Careful editing for all of these recordings is ongoing, and many will form part of an exciting new project in late 2018.

Updates to come.

Editing / New Project

I've taken some time away from the field to edit and curate the significant body of recordings made during the spring and summer period.

Selected sounds will be uploaded as part of a 2017 sound series in the coming months, so keep an eye on the blog for updates.

Around this, I'm preparing equipment and researching isolated locations along the Severn Estuary for autumn and winter recordings; target species this year include teal, black-tailed godwit, barnacle geese and a range of other wildfowl and wading birds.

Green Space has been played just under 700 times, and has been entered into a couple of short film competitions. Thanks to all for listening and watching.

Work has also started on a new, short-duration project, focusing on an ancient location in Dartmoor.

Green Space

Work continues on Green Space, which explores themes of green infrastructure and noise pollution in our cities.

Using a combination of adapted microcomputers, high-level programming languages and recording equipment, I'm building on the overall aesthetic of Plastic, which was selected for screening during the opening ceremony of the NaturVision Film Festival 2016 in Ludwigsberg, Germany.

Updates coming soon.

New Work Underway

Following the success of Slimbridge, I've started working on a new environmental film exploring themes of green infrastructure and noise pollution, using a combination of adapted microcomputers, high-level programming languages and recording equipment.

In the meantime, feel free to check out Plastic, which was selected for screening during the opening ceremony of the NaturVision Film Festival 2016 in Ludwigsberg, Germany.

I've also just completed a busy period of spring/early-summer recording, adding some fascinating sounds to my library. Highlights include blackcap mimicry (with the imitated song thrush clearly audible in the distance), and a whitethroat singing amongst coastal scrub.

Praise for Slimbridge

It's been just under a month since Slimbridge launched.

People from all over the world have been listening, and I've received some incredibly positive feedback and words of encouragement.

It's been received particularly well in the media and professional audio communities:

‘Mark Ferguson has recorded some wonderful sounds of nature.’ — Damian Carrington, Guardian

‘The sounds are very evocative, and really recreate the feel of Slimbridge.’ — Paul Virostek, Creative Field Recording

Several key conservation organisations are now planning to run features on the project, and I've even had a request for inclusion on an undergraduate syllabus in one of the UK's leading academic institutions. 

All of this exposure should help raise awareness of our unique wetlands, their sounds, and the remarkable species they support.

My thanks to everyone out there for taking the time to listen.

Slimbridge Launched

My latest extended recording project featuring sounds from the UK's flagship Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust reserve is online. Thanks to everyone who made it possible!

I'll continue to post updates and thoughts from listeners in the coming weeks.

Listen here.